Tag Archives: classic

Luscious Jewelry Terms

Starting with “L”

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Labradorescence – here we have an extraordinarily fancy way of saying that a stone looks blue (as in the color, not melancholic).  Specifically, this occurs with the gem labradorite, and in some very rare instances, in Labrador retrievers.

Lace Ring – this is a ring mounting type where the sides are constructed of an open webbing, which obviously resembles the material that fancy underwear is made out of.

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Lambrequin – while this sounds like it is the odd lovechild of a lamb and a mannequin, it actually refers to little ornamental pieces that look like woven fabric.  Worn by fancy soldiers of yesteryear, this arty thing was commonly found in one’s coat of arms.

Diamond-Lighthouse-selling-Lambrequin-jewelry

Lapidary – this is the name given to those who cut, polish, slice and dice gemstones and dense minerals (except diamonds, of course – those who deal solely with diamonds are called “diamantaires,” and wouldn’t sully their fastidious fingers with lesser gems).  Some lapidaries also can carve cameos, thereby making them mini sculptors (take that, diamond snobs!)

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Lathe – is something that modern jewelers thank the high heavens for each day.  It’s a sophisticated machine that basically does all of the essential jeweler tasks in one, such as grinding, milling, drilling, (thrilling!), and oh so much more.

Latten – this is a material that is comprised of copper and other, less expensive metals (it’s an alloy).  Highly popular throughout the entire Medieval period (5th through 15th centuries), latten could easily be shaped into words and symbols on jewelry, like latin phrases and ‘yo momma’ jokes.  Most signet rings created during this time were made of latten (those are the rings you would stick in wax to leave your seal on letters, like an ancient @handle.)

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Lava Jewelry – a very specific type of jewelry endemic to the ruins of Pompeii, Italy.  Travelers venturing to Pompeii during the 17th century, seeking to unearth more of the location’s petrified secrets, would return home with souvenir jewelry made out of the lava/mineral debris from the actual site.  These would often be in the form of dirt and clay-colored cameos, carved to resemble some of the lovely lost Roman souls.

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Lavallière – a delicate link chain that culminates in a hanging pendant (typically featuring a pearly pearl).  Turn of the 20th century kids couldn’t wait to get their hands on these.  The necklace type takes its nomenclature from the allegedly breathtaking Louise Françoise de La Baume Le Blanc, who not only possesses an insanely long name, but was the number one side chick of Louis XIV (hey, in 17th century France this was something to be proud of).  She was also the ‘Duchesse de La Vallière’ (hence the necklace name…finally).

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Lazo – no, not the term for a sloth-like person in Spanish, this actually means “bow” en Español, and is employed when describing earrings that have some sort of design at the top, a bow in the middle and then a ‘drop,’ or hanging, jewel or other metal piece.  The phrase eventually morphed to include brooches that have a ribbon motif.

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Leontine – pocket watches in Spain would simply crash to the floor (el piso) without the aid of a leontine, the chain that connects the watch to one’s pocket (via a little clasp).  Often constructed with a flourish (hanging gold tassels and the like), leontines were the bold precursor to wallet chains, donned primarily by mid-90’s posers.

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Limoges Enamel – this is a precise form of enameling that put Limoges, France on the map.  Conceived during the 1400’s, this enameling technique uses a metal material as the canvas to which a heavy enamel layer is applied, and then a clear one over that (really letting the colors ‘pop’).  This artistic practice is used today in nail salons around the world.

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Liquid Silver – much like the body of the ferociously undulating Terminator first introduced in Terminator 2: Judgement Day, liquid silver seductively flows like a shiny river of metal.  It’s the name given to sterling silver beads, which when polished to a fiery sheen and strung tightly together, simply ooze opulence and stream through the night.

Lobster Claw – many of you may have a lobster claw dangling from your body right at this moment and you don’t even know it.  Before you reach for the lemon and butter, this is just a kind of clasp that at lot of necklaces and bracelets use.  It’s fun to open it and pinch your friends with.

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Lorgnette – you’ve seen plenty of fancy ladies of the past using lorgnettes; they are those glasses that are held up to the face with a precious metal handle (not an adorably precocious one; ‘precious’ here meaning one that is made of gold or silver, etc.)  Lorgnette rose to prominence during the tail end of the 19th century and stayed in fashion throughout the daring Art Deco era.  Can be used today in lieu of Google glasses.

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Lost Wax Casting – in French it’s “cire perdue,” but in any language it means the same thing; you make a wax mold of some sort, pour hot liquid metal in there and then burn the wax away, leaving you with a newly cast metal, primed for a good ole polishin’.  And yes, it also sounds like the casting session to the mysterious, hit ABC series “Lost Wax.”

Lover’s Eye Miniature – let’s take a look see at this jewelry concept, which will undoubtedly go down as one of the creepiest in history.  It’s basically a little pin, pendant, brooch or ring encased painting that your lover gives to you.  Depicted there, is their very own eye, symbolically watching over (aka ‘stalking’) you at all times.  This trended briefly at the end of the 18th century, however the Lover’s Eyes soon lost favor as people started to accumulate various lovers, and therefore, more eyes to peer at them.  Presumably, they just got freaked out by all the incessant staring.

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Lover’s Knot – way less weird than the previous item, this refers to rings that were crafted to depict two pieces of rope that were tied in a symbolic union.  The ancient Romans used them as betrothal rings; contemporary grooms use them for the same thing…when they are trying to come up with clever ways to not have to buy a diamond.

Luckenbooth Brooch – you can take their land, but you can never take their brooches.  These charming Scottish pins are designed to look like a heart (or two hearts).  They were first made during the Middle Ages and became fashionable during the 1800s.  This term can also be applied when you happen to luck into a booth in a restaurant.

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Lunula – what’s not to love about the Bronze Age?  That’s where we got this moon-shaped necklace from, which can be made from any material but often shows up in gold or…bronze.  Lunulas are not just beautifully designed creations that evoke images of nighttime illumination and revelry, they also have a really fun name to say out loud.

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-Joe Leone  

Engagement Ring #Trends: Fall 2015

via etsy.com
via etsy.com

When it comes to buying engagement rings, most people tend to (smartly) play it safe.  Jumping on some new and zany trend clearly may not be the most practical move when we’re talking about an item that is supposed to last for the duration of you and your partner’s *eep* lives.  Luckily, there are some jewelry “trends” that do such an exquisite job of staying within the boundaries of class and sophistication, they will undoubtedly be able to go the distance.

The following styles are not just currently popular; they each hold a certain uniqueness that right recipient may verily identify with.  Read on to see which variety may perfectly suit your soon-to-be betrothed, thereby ensuring an elated “YES!” – as opposed to a “Wow, well…it really is something.

Twist and Shout

via etsy.com
via etsy.com

The Twist style is definitely not a new fad, but is seeing quite the surge in popularity these days.  Dating as far back as the Victorian era, twisted bands are cool for a multitude of reasons.  First, they look very intriguing, as if the wearer’s hand is ensconced in a vine and ivy laden forrest.  Second, they symbolize an entwining of two partners, in what could be perceived in a highly (*giggle*) sensual manner.  Just think, the people entering into this eternal bond of marriage, their bodies wrapped around each other, for life.  Also, this is a nice pick if you just happen to like knitting.

Do I Detect an Accent?

via etsy.com
via etsy.com

As far as accents go, this year it’s go bold or go home (to your native land).  There are actually a lot of ring styles and designs that fit into this category, so let’s examine a few of them.  First, there are the floral inspired bands, which feature some flouncy flower element to them.  Either tiny petals encircling a center stone, little leaves around the band or some other incarnation of naturally grown, blossoming beauty.  Next, there are the bows.  An elegant bow can enhance the aesthetics of an otherwise humdrum ring (however, try not to go overboard here, as a big, bouncy bow will make the ring look like a cartoonish cotillon present).  Last, rings that feature a center diamond (or other gemstone) that is cut in an irregular shape or fashion.  Within this sub-genre would be the rough cut diamond grouping.  These stones can be breathtaking, and wholly represent “raw beauty.”

I can see your Halo…Halo

via etsy.com
via etsy.com

The double halo.  This angelic motif has been around for a while, but has really been gaining momentum as of late.  The obvious benefits of a halo setting are that it really directs the eye to the center of the ring and also gives the main attraction stone an added bolstering of melee side-sparkle.  In addition, the halo aides in giving the illusion that the primary stone is somehow larger.  Ergo, two halos do twice the heavy lifting in this sparkle-enhancing context.  Twin halos also make the ring look “stacked,” as if there are just so many layers of diamonds on the thing, that it’s got to be extraordinarily valuable (not to say that that’s anyone’s goal or anything, *cough cough*).

Deco the Halls with Art 

via etsy.com
via etsy.com

For the Gatsby-loving Gal, Art Deco can be the way to go.  The current climate of ring design, and the general ethos surrounding engagement ring culture is that you can’t miss with pieces from, or inspired by, this era.  Either actual vintage items from the 20’s/30’s or ones just now designed to recreate that distinct look, Art Deco rings have a style like no other.  The mixing of colored gemstones, the rectangular and oblong cuts, the juxtaposition of the simple and the ornate; all leave quite the impression on one’s finger.  There’s just something ravishingly regal and cool about Art Deco rings, as if the wearer is both elegant and refined, but also knows how to pop bottles and get down, flapper style.

This quartet of ring styles embodies what is currently trending; yet they each should have true staying power in their own right.  If you think your special someone may prefer a more traditional mounting, by all means, go with your intuition.  In truth, your best bet is to either ask their close friends what they really want or (depending on the kind of relationship you have) just ask them outright.  While any ring will be appreciated, one that really speaks to them will be forever #adored.

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-Joe Leone