Tag Archives: how to sell your diamond

Inspirational Jewelry Keepsakes

(Jewelry Terms: I, J & K)

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Idiochromatic – much like an idiosyncratic gemstone enthusiast, stones of this ilk are essentially pure at heart.  That is to say that the hue exhibited by this type of gem is a result of its integral chemical components, not from impurities in the stone.  The other kind of gems are called allochromatic (like the sultry sapphire) and appear a certain shade because they are laden with beautifully colorful dirt.

Ingot – oddly enough, this is not a French term and so it is pronounced exactly how it looks.  This describes a precious metal that has been rolled, drawn and stamped to create specific pattern or design.  In non-jewelry form, an ingot can take the shape of a bar, brick or seriously valuable paperweight.

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Inro – are nifty little carrying cases that handily attach to one’s kimono.  If you didn’t catch on, they are made in Japan.  Usually crafted out of wood or metal (or for the murderous sect, tortoise or ivory), these cool cases have various metals, lacquers and shells inlaid to construct artful scenes and marvelous creatures (ie, Godzilla wreaking havoc on the populace).

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Inseperables – no, not you and your friend Stacy in 6th grade.  This is a brooch that came into fashion during the 1830’s, replete with two stick pins that are held together with a tiny little chain.  No one knows why this style disappeared or why it’s name looks like a distinct misspelling.

Invisible Setting – this is a type of ring setting that you can claim you have given your lover when you actually have given them nothing.  Actually, its a setting type that makes a row of featured gems appear as if there is nothing holding them in place.  This is achieved by cutting tiny divots into the gem girdles and then securing them with a minuscule matrix of wires.  Gemstones mounted in this kind of setting can look like a row of teeth (presumably held straight with Invisalign braces).

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J

Jabot Pin – yup; you jab this pin right into yourself.  On either end of the pin are fancifully arranged jewels.  Each side sticks into clothing so the only thing one sees are the sparkling jewels, not the dangerous pin mechanism underneath.  Jabot refers to that frilly ever-so-manly swath of fabric that men of the mid-1600’s adorned with cocky glee; the jabot pin holds said lacy puff piece in place.  During the Art Deco explosion of the 1920’s, women took a shine to Jabot pins, making them an indispensable facet of flapper fashion.

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Japonaiserie (aka Japanesque) – any jewelry item that exhibits influence from Japan, typically those embossed with lacquer.  These got hot in the western world at the end of the 1800’s.  Elements commonly found on such works include bamboo motifs and etchings of provincial peoples fanning themselves.  The best way to care for this type of jewelry is to wax on, wax off.

Jarretière – this is a trendy bracelet that looks kind of like a chic little belt for your wrist.  Often made from metal patterned with geometric shapes (like the honeycomb), this comely clasp came into style during the 1800’s and hasn’t really waned yet, as you can still find them in Saks Fifth Avenue and Claire’s Accessories alike.

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Jasperware – Fashion (and, naturally, pottery) maven Josiah Wedgwood developed this porcelain-esque product which mimics onyx, but also allows for you to have a white design on the surface.  This material was used to make cameos and other fun pieces during the 1700’s, but eventually died out in terms of popularity.  Perhaps an integral lesson in survival learned by Wedgwood’s grandson: Charles Darwin.  #FashionOfTheFittest

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Jou-Jou Or – the adorable French term for “toy gold,” which is a gold alloy that has a fairly low karat rating of 6.  It is also the proper way to address the first two potential people to be chosen for something, in a row of three, pending the picker has an audible accent (ie: “Jou, jou or…jou.”)

Justaucorps – the end of the 1600’s saw France gripped in Justaucorps fever.  It’s a relatively trim and fitted coat that suddenly, unapologetically flares out at the waist (basically, a groovy disco jacket of 17th century Europe).  Included on this jewelry aggregation because the buttons were usually constructed of diamonds, gold, gems, silver and perhaps even small, mirrored balls that reflected light in a totally far out way.

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K

Keeper Ring – sometimes jewelry can be more about function than fashion.  The Keeper Ring is just that; a band that keeps another, more costly ring from slipping off one’s slender digits.  These became necessary during the 1700’s, when more people starting wearing diamond rings (and possibly eating greasy fast food).  Eventually they would be deemed ‘guard rings,’ and they went from just utilitarian bands to fairly fancy things.  They now not only keep the expensive ring in place but also add some extra blingage to it.  The third incarnation of a keeper ring is the obviously binder clasp that secures loose leaf in your Trapper Keeper.

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Kitemarks – are little insignias that the 19th century British began stamping on their jewelry to indicate the date that the specific jewelry design of a piece was officially registered (similar to a hallmark).  The date would be found in a diamond or kite shape.  It’s kind of like the original copyright date found at the front of a book (not the publication date).  Those who opposed this and suggested that they should just stamp the date that the piece was forged on the metal were told to “Go fly a kitemark.”

-Joe Leone

Heavenly Jewelry Terms

starting with “H”

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Habille – some people are never satisfied, are they?  Unable to remain content with the lovely, first incarnation of cameo jewelry, the gentry of the 1840’s decided that the new ‘it’ item would be Habilles.  These are excessively large cameos that actually have other pieces of multi-dimensional jewelry placed on the figures depicted.  Meaning, the ivory lady hanging out in the cameo may be wearing diamond earrings and a necklace.  The name ‘Habille’ was used because “tacky” was already taken.

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Half-Hunter – is exactly what it sounds like (not really).  A ‘Hunting Case’ is the metal encasement that protects a pocket watch, ostensibly while you are on gentlemanly pursuits like day-laboring, engaging in a vigorous croquet match or, of course, tiny game hunting.  The half-hunter is when the glass is exposed – surely only wildly adventurous types would sport such a brazenly reckless and potentially unsafe device.

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Hallmark – much like the sappy greeting card company of the same name, a Hallmark is an intaglio (branded into the metal of fine jewelry) that is very respected and beloved by the peoples of the world.  The term is derived from the stodgy old British practice of goldsmiths being required to have their wears ‘assayed’ (analyzed for genuineness and caliber) at the official Goldsmith Hall – which the O.G.s (old goldsmiths) commonly referred to as ‘The Hall.’  Hence, a hallmark is an official grading of the quality of the metal, stamped right on those lil suckers.

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Handkerchief Ring – is not at all what is sounds like (actually, it is precisely that).  Fancy folk of yesteryear just simply couldn’t be bothered to hold  their handkerchiefs (or, heaven forfend, place them in their pockets!), so a ring was devised that has a chain hanging from it that leads to yet another ring.  In this deliciously dainty and completely necessary second ring, one could slip a handkerchief, or “nose rag,” through and let it flounce about, as the wearer went about their foppish affairs.

Handy Pins – are pins that happen to be handy.  Certain individuals, who happened to be alive during the late 1900’s, just needed a hand keeping their clothing fastened together.  These individuals may or may not have been aware of the somewhat recent invention of the ‘button.’

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Heishi – this is a jewelry style specific to San Felipe Pueblo and Santa Domingo natives now living in the American southwest, primarily New Mexico.  The main identifying characteristic of this jewelry type is the appearance of small shell and bead stones artfully arranged together.  Tiny holes are drilled into these elements which allow for string or twine to hold them tightly together.  Often turquoise, or stones of this hue, are used.  Many tourists who venture to the southwest purchase such items, looking strange as they return to their homes wearing the beautiful bracelets and necklaces along with their Crocs.

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Hellenism – or “heck-enism” for the easily offended, is the ancient Greek-specific style that was brought back into fashion by those crafty Neoclassicists around the 1700s.  See, Helen of Troy (that of ancient Greece, not upstate New York) was a Greek historical/mythological figure who was essentially the Joan Rivers of her day; adored, revered and a wicked judge of fashion.

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Higa – is one of the funnier things on this list.  A higa is a hand amulet, similar to the peace invoking ‘hamsa,’ only in this breed the hand is arranged in a way that is …not so nice.  With the thumb poking through the pointer and middle finger, the higa illustrates a very old, very dirty type of insult (use your imagination to figure out what that is supposed to represent…)  Higas still pop up in modern jewelry, especially in South America, and obviously make great gifts for people who are despised/clueless.

Holbeinesque – you know you’re cool when an entire style of jewelry is named after you.  Such is this case with Hans Holbein, who was tearing up the hot German art scene during the early 1500s.  Holbeinesque jewelry is recognized for having a nice sized center stone, typically oval, surrounded by chrome laden, intricate enamel work.  Became all the rage during the 1870s, in what was defined as the Neo-Renaissance period (much like when modern people go to the Renaissance Fair and speak in awful faux British accents).

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Hololith Ring – aside being fun to say, this is a lovely loop that adorns the finger, cut from one solid piece of gemstone or mineral.  This style of cutting gems is popular with the always jazzy jade.  The fairly preterite invention of Hololith rings symbolized a momentous step in gemstone liberation, as the proud gems showed they ‘don’t need no metal to be a strong, independent ring.’  Work.

Honeycomb – this is a design style made enormously successful by the fancy brand Van Cleef & Arpels during the economically booming epoch of the 1930s.  Those not living in the Dust Bowl would treat themselves to bracelets crafted in this snazzy pattern, which was actually borrowed from the ‘garter bracelets’ of the Victorian period, which were actually borrowed from bees.

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Horror Vacui – Mwah-ha-ha!  Yes, this jewelry classification is indeed scary.  Translated from the beautiful, dead language of Latin, this means “fear of empty space.”  In jewelry terms this signifies pieces that are completely jam packed with bulbous gemstones, gaudy designs and other hard-on-the-eyes objects.  A style endemic to many crowns, coronation items and floral pantsuits that your Aunt Rosy just can’t live without.

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Hotel Silver – any white metal that is desperately trying to pass itself off as authentic silver is referred to by this euphemism.  So don’t be fooled if someone tries to sound like they are giving you a fancy type of metal when presenting you with some bogus hotel silver (it really should be called “Motel Silver”).

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 -Joe Leone

Glorious Jewelry Terms

Starting with “G”

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Gallery – much like the photo galleries you are ‘click-baited’ into viewing online, a gallery in the jewelry realm typically aids in making the main attraction (gemstone) look even cooler.  A series of designs or repeated patterns, usually accompanying a center stone or other precious material, is what constitutes a gallery in this sense.

Gardinetto – if you’ve got a bunch of sapphires, rubies and emeralds you need to show off, you need a practical way to present them; luckily the enterprising Italians came up with the gardinetto.  This is a little jewelry basket (or pot or coffee can) of flowers, where the gems can reside.  Most commonly used as a trinket to trade amongst lovers during the mid-1700’s, gardinettos rose to fashion once again during the extravagantly fabulous Art Deco period (the roaring/raging/raving ’20’s).

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Gaud – this is a very neat little orb that hangs from, typically, a rosary.  This tiny ball can be opened and inside there are often entire scenes carved within, usually straight from the Bible, replete with sacred saints and other symbolically significant peeps.  Mostly made of wood and resembling walnuts (these kind are actually referred to as ‘nuts’ – hence the term “religious nut”), gauds can sometimes show up in metal forms.

Georgian Silver – around the inception of the Baroque period (referring to 1600’s Europe, not necessarily when poor people were feeling especially ba-roke), people began to notice that setting white diamonds in silver made them really sparkle.  Fast forward a bit to the Georgian era, when silver mines in South America were booming and India was popping out and polishing more diamonds than e’er seen before; thus, the perfect recipe for silver Euro-ring fun!

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Germanic Jewelry – when you think of Goth jewelry, you probably imagine black bats, big pewter crucifixes and scary goblin pendants, not ornately decorated gold with glorious, colored gems inlaid.  The jewelry of the Germanic tribes (the 5th century Visigoths, Ostrogoths, Vandals …Hoodlums, etc.) greatly resembled that of the Romans, as these tribes had been under their resplendent rule for generations.  Basically a lot of colored glass, precious stones and intricate designs on gilded materials.

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Giacomo Raffaelli – if there is a name synonymous with the mastery of mosaics, it’s Raffaelli.  This 18th century born italian artiste was so adept at crafting mosaics, he eventually was able to create a ‘micro mosaic.’  These tiny masterpieces could then be used in jewelry design, much to the delight of late period Settecento (1700s) donne everywhere.  Thankfully, this concept would become mass produced and is now responsible for breathtaking Cosplay jewelry items everywhere.

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Gimmel Ring – is basically two bands that are twisted together to form one complete ring.  Used as symbols of betrothal during the Renaissance, where the groom would wear one ring and the bride to be the other (essentially, his and her engagement rings), which the bride would absorb into one fused ring on the day of the wedding.  A little gimmicky, these gimmel (which is actually derived from the Latin word, gemellus, for ‘twin’) rings would sometimes contain a secretly inscribed baby and skeleton under the main stone, as an eerie reminder that you are born with nothing and you die with nothing, and that nothing is forever.

…How romantic.

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Girandole – All the rage during the 1600s, these are earrings that consist of three teardrop shaped gems which hang down from a fanciful bow design.  Once the 1700s rolled around and people started to view these as “le lame” the earrings would typically be broken down into their component parts and redesigned into less heavy (and not so gaudy) earrings and other jewelry types.  Hence, we have the first instances of “jewelry repurposing” on record.

Girasol – Ok, this is the name ascribed to any type of gemstone that exhibits a milky luster that appears to drip along and mosey inside the stone as it is moved (or as the sun or Smurf nightlight or whatever light source hitting it is put into motion).  Girasols should never be given as a present to lactose intolerant individuals.  That’s just cruel.

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Glyptography – What do intaglios engraved into metal and cameos etched from a stone have in common?  Why, they are both are shining examples of glyptography, the ancient art of sending messages through jewelry.  Duh.  Long story relatively short, people were trying to text each other by carving things (called petroglyphs) into cave walls around 15,000 BC – Cut To a few thousand years later and folks were using these etchings to identify personal property with – these became “seals” and were eventually worn, for good luck, favor from the gods, and all that jazz.

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Gold à Quatre Couleurs – one can never have too much gold; or too many gold colored varieties at once.  This term, coined in the 1750s, means you have four different gold hued alloys all employed in one jewelry piece.  A repetitious pattern is often created to give the overall golden design symmetry, beauty and super ultra uber goldiness.

Gorget – getting gorged on a gorgeous gorget is just glorious, no?  This guy started out as a metal collar that had an open back (we’re talking during the ancient European times of roughly 800 BC), and would go through numerous iterations over the centuries.  It would eventually become more of a military thing, as soldiers would wear them for protection.  Various cultures changed gorgets up a bit, crafting them from bones, shells, leather, ribbon, etc.  Certain designers working today have thrown the style back to the elder times, resorting to full on metal once again.

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Grisaille – this French expression means “in the grey,” and is not nearly as cryptic in jewelry practices as the idiom makes it sound.  It’s an enameling technique where first a black, or “noir” (again, really not mysterious), layer of enamel is applied to a surface, and then white enamel is later layered over it.  Depending on the degree of thickness of the white enamel, the various “shades of grey” are then expressed (again, really, nothing clandestine, mystical or seductive going on here; just boring enameling).  Some jewelry glazed with this process is said to be cursed (alas, there it is!)

Grotesque – is a vile piece of jewelry, like something purchased at “Hot Topic,” right?  Nope.  Stemming from the Latin “grotto,” translated to ‘hollow,’ this refers to the Roman practice of encircling a main figure with a bunch of finely carved out scrolls.  For instance, a #troll with #scrolls.

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Guilloché – if you are good with a lathe, you can probably bang out a really cool guilloché design.  Just in case you aren’t a jeweler, a ‘lathe’ is a deluxe engraving tool, and the guilloché technique involves forging a concentric pattern, that originates from the center of a piece and appears to ripple outward.  It looks like a water droplet in a pond, or a really angry cartoon character with those squiggly lines coming out of his head.

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Guirlande – usually showing up in the form of a gem encrusted floral wreath, the guirlande is a broach-like pendant.  Totally en vogue during the Renaissance period amongst the nobles, the NeoClassics dredged this style up and wore it with tons of throwback flare.

Gutta-Percha – this makes this list just because it is fun to say.  Aside from the fact that is sounds like a colorful Italian curse word, it’s a rubber-esque organic material that comes from “pantropical” trees.  It’s a stygian substance, and was used primarily in the ever-uplifting-to-wear ‘mourning jewelry.’

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Gypsy Ring – we conclude with the beautifully bohemian gypsy ring.  Key characteristics include a single stone, in a bezel mounting, that often is elevated just a hair above the band.  The cabalistic center gem can be of any variety, but cool stones like obsidian, onyx or dark amethyst make it all the more mysterious.

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-Joe Leone 

How to Rekindle your Relationship with Your Diamond

10 Fun Things to Do with Your Diamond

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You and your diamond have had quite the run, haven’t you?  It’s stayed on your left ring finger, around your neck, on your nose or belly button, or some other place we won’t discuss right now, for a nice long while.  You’ve seen various parts of this great country of ours together; heck, you’ve maybe even crossed seas and gazed upon grandiose iconic worldly sights as one.

But, like all relationships, things can eventually turn stale.

It doesn’t seem to sparkle as brightly when you glance at it now – or maybe you’re just not appreciating it the way you once did.  Well, the only solution is to jump start your once powerful bond and leave the stagnant waters of complacency behind.  Here are ten fun things you can do with your diamond to bring the luster back into your brilliantly shared life.

1) Wear your engagement ring to a Singles Night.

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Look, everybody loves attention; your diamond is definitely no exception.  When you proudly don your diamond engagement ring to a singles night, numerous potential suitors (and even a few curious ladies) will inquire about what you are doing there/why are you wearing the ring/can they possibly join you in a polygamous union?  As you flirtatiously flaunt your diamond around and talk all about it, the two of you will feel a renewed kinship and complicit affinity for one another.

2) Bring it to a basket/foot/baseball game and when the Kiss Cam gets to you, shove your loved one out of the way and kiss your diamond instead.

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What better way to make the whole world jealous than to project your love onto the jumbo-tron?  With that beautifully cheesy heart graphic superimposed around you two, your friends at home watching ESPN will be simultaneously jealous…and baffled.  Your diamond will be eternally grateful for the unbridled outburst of affection.

3) Take it to a Natural History Museum and show your diamond its roots.

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Have you ever taken the time to let your diamond really reminisce about where it comes from?  Hit the Geology wing of any reputable museum and let your diamond stroll down memory lane as it recounts its time as a young, wide-eyed piece of carbon, hanging with its friends deep beneath the earth’s crust.  Let it regale you with the enthralling tale of how it shot up on the Kimberlite express to the planet’s surface, eventually making its way to your finger; and into your heart.

4) Hang around a section of a jewelry store where the diamonds showcased are all of a smaller size and/or inferior quality.

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Nothing boosts your diamond’s spirits like letting it feel superior to others.  Let’s face it, the diamond world is a highly competitive one; each stone is precisely measured and evaluated, and microscopic flaws can have a dramatic impact on its desirability.  When you compare your diamond to a bunch of less attractive stones, it will feel like a million bucks.  Add to this tantalizing tableau a bunch of onlookers, shopping for their own diamond, who can only gaze at yours in envy.  The perfect jolt to your team-self-esteem.

5) Attend a lecture on a serious topic of some sort; use your diamond to reflect light into the presenter/orator’s eye.

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Executing wacky pranks with your loved stone instantly interjects a little joy back into your waning relationship.  Utilizing your diamond’s primary strength (that of reflecting/refracting light – in this case, into the ocular region of some boring person), will have the two of you giggling with glee.  Well, you at least (the diamond has no mouth).

6) On the night of the first snowfall of the year, throw your diamond into the pristine white blanket of snow – then find it.

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Toss that cherished stone directly into the awaiting ivory mounds.  Wait a minute.  Then begin your quest.

As you frantically paw at the accumulated snow, freezing your little digits off, you will feel a growing sense of urgency and reinvigorated passion for your diamond.  The thought that you will never find it crosses your mind, and you even panic a bit.  Once you see that tiny sparkle amongst the fallen flakes, you will breathe a sigh of relief like no other.  Reunited with your diamond, you’ll see how much it truly means to you.  From your diamond’s perspective, it’s quite the adventure as well; surrounded by millions of snow flakes (which are all singular and unique, just like every diamond) it can undergo a humbling experience too.

7)  Watch any of these films about diamond heists together.

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Have your very own “Netflix and chill” session with your diamond.  The two of you will unconsciously feel the need to cuddle close together as onscreen gems are stolen from their rightful owners.  You will clutch your diamond ever so tightly, reassured that the two of you truly belong together for eternity.

8)  Have a spa/pamper day-cum-ring cleaning.

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Get your hair, nails and face did – all while your diamond looks on.  Take it to the jeweler for its own cleansing and you’ll have quite the rewarding reciprocal endeavor.

9)  Create an instagram account that is soley selfies of you and your diamond.

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After your friends and loved ones see the glorious series of shots of just the two of you together, all you need to tell them is this: don’t be #jelly.

10)  Etch your love to the world.

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That’s right; it’s time for some good ole fashioned graffiti.  Using your diamond’s unfathomably hard edges, scratch you and your diamond’s initials (encircled in a big heart) all over town (*if you do not know your diamond’s initials, feel free to just inscribe its GIA certification number).  Into the town’s oldest oak tree, the huge bay window at the mall, your annoying neighbor’s car; there’s literally no surface you can’t use to espouse you and your diamond’s undying love.  Seeing your mutual affection indelibly raked into the canvases of everyday life, you will once again feel in your heart that the two of you are made for each other (…one of you made by other humans, the other made by heat, pressure and dirt).

Hopefully, after employing these delightful techniques, you and your diamond will fully appreciate each other once again.  If these methods just dont do the trick, alas, it is sad to say that all hope may be lost for you and your little gem friend.  If this is the case, it probably is time to part ways and move on in a sensitive, mature and morally conscientious way.  Why not let someone else enjoy your diamond?  You both will be able to reach your full potential then.  Check out diamondlighthouse.com.  We will find a good home for your diamond, and you will be compensated for the highest amount possible.   Please, do the right thing; for you and your diamond.

-Joe Leone 

Celebrities Who Pay Child Support (And Some Who Don’t)

 

via Featureflash / Shutterstock.com
via Featureflash / Shutterstock.com

So many people are delinquent in paying child support, there is a whole federal bureau designated to its enforcement. The Office of Child Support Enforcement tries its best to help people who can’t afford child support and people who can’t afford to be gypped child support, but they’re merely putting a dent in the over $100 billion owed to mothers and fathers who legally deserve the payments. CNN Money explained that child support delinquencies cost taxpayers an estimated $53 billion in 2012.

The chains of child support certainly don’t escape the rich and famous, with some celebrities’ child support payments apparently getting lost in the mail. Here’s a look at Hollywood to see who paid their 17 percent per child, and who didn’t.

Who Didn’t

When things turn sour, many people run away. Below are a few examples of celebrities who apparently tried to ignore the problem of child support payments rather than deal with it.

Levi Johnston: After a highly public bout with marriage, Sarah Palin’s ex-almost-son-in-law managed to spend $1 million on dirt bikes and four wheelers instead of making his court-mandated child support payments totaling $21,000. Boys and their toys. (TMZ)

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via s_bukley / Shutterstock.com

 

Jon Gosselin: After making tons of money on his kids and his wife by getting a television show dedicated to their very full house, Jon of Jon and Kate Plus 8 decided he no longer really wanted to support the household he vacated. In an interview, he said Kate pays household costs at her house, and he pays household costs at his.

via People.com
via People.com

 

Allen Iverson: In a (not very) shocking announcement in 2013, Allen Iverson of basketball fame announced angrily that he no longer had as much money as he used to, citing this as a reason to skip out on his child support payments. Since his ex-wife got tired of hunting him down every month to make him hand over the check, she took him to court to get the whole amount in a one-and-done lump sum.

via Everett Collection / Shutterstock.com
via Everett Collection / Shutterstock.com

 

Skeet Ulrich: After his ‘90s fame came to a halt, actor Skeet Ulrich apparently could not afford his children anymore, and stopped making child support payments. The situation got real when he was held in contempt of court after letting his back payments rack up to almost $290,000.

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via Helga Esteb / Shutterstock.com

 

Who Did

It’s always better to end on a positive note. Below are some celebrities who, despite being asked to give a lot to their pesky children, have thus far done their duty and paid up.

Russell Simmons: According to TheRichest.com, Def Jam co-founder Russell Simmons pays $40,000 per month in child support to be split between his two daughters, to whom he has also legally promised new cars when they turn 16. Until they get the cars of their own, Simmons buys a new car worth at least $60,000 for them to be transported in.

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via a katz / Shutterstock.com

 

Terrell Owens: Even after many purported financial troubles, Terrell Owens has apparently managed to squeeze out approximately $44K per each of his four kids per month. While his financial forecast is not looking good, Owens has not yet made any lists of celebrities with egregiously outstanding child support payments.

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via Ken Durden / Shutterstock.com

 

Donald Trump: The Trump paid about $300,000 per year (equaling almost $500,000 per year today) in child support after his high profile divorce in the 1990s, according to a New York news station. This number seems surprisingly low, seeing as his post-divorce alimony payments were $350,000 and the former Mrs. Trump got the house.

via Christopher Halloran / Shutterstock.com
via Christopher Halloran / Shutterstock.com

 

Britney Spears: Pop princess Britney Spears is one of the few ladies who makes the list of people who pay big bucks in child support. After a sad public decline in her mental health, Spears signed up to pay $20,000 per month in child support.

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via s_bukley / Shutterstock.com

 

While it can be interesting to see which celebrities fall behind on their court-mandated duties, not being able to pay child support is no joke. Selling a diamond may help raise the cash needed to either pay child support, or to make up for someone else who fails to do their part.

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